Skystream 3.7® wind turbines power microgrid, sustains remote village


Skystream 3.7® wind turbines power microgrid, sustains remote village

An update from Perryville, AK
Since the installation of 10 Skystream 3.7® wind turbines in the fall of 2008 in the Native Village of Perryville, AK, a federally recognized tribal village of 130 people, some 105,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) have been produced. That is roughly 26,250 kWh per year, 2,625 kWh/turbine annually, according to Gerald Kosbruk, president of the tribal government in the southern Alaska Peninsula. The environmentally conscious lifestyle has fused together tribal values for not only subsistence benefits but also for the creation of clean, independent energy production.

OFFSETTING FUEL USE

With fuel running about $4.50 per gallon, Kosbruk places two 30,000-gallon fuel orders per year, totaling some $270,000 annually. One fuel order is usually burned within five months, however, with the help of the Skystream turbines, Kosbruk says the village has 5,000 gallons remaining after six months. The turbines extend the winter fuel supply by over a month, said Kosbruk. Moral of the story here is that the village has cut its tie with diesel fuel from the power plant, which prior to the microgrid installation, Perryville was run on one diesel generator. This creates an autonomous, sovereign lifestyle, lessening utility company reliance.

TRIBAL VALUES

The village remains committed to an Alutiiq (Pacific Yupik or Sugpiag) culture and believes in a subsistence lifestyle where commercial fishing provides cash income. The village strives to maintain and support its inhabitants at a minimum level, allowing for only a marginal, basic livelihood. The elimination of diesel strengthens the native tribes beliefs and self-reliance, by allocating energy production to be derived from nature rather than depending on an external resource.

Check out Kirk Garoutte in a video (below) shot after the Skystream 3.7 wind farm was installed in Perryville, AK.
LOW-MAINTENANCE IS KEY

Out of the 10-turbine microgrid, only two Skystream’s have had to be serviced for maintenance since 2008, said Kosbruk. Otherwise even amid Perryville’s harsh weather advertises, the turbines stand strong and true. The turbines produce around 25 kWh at peak performance, said Kosbruk. During the summer months, production decreases because the local school is shut down and the demand for energy becomes more conservative.

“All-in-all,” said Kosbruk, “they [turbines] have been great for us. [The turbines were] a good investment.” Installation of the turbines was an initial $100,000 investment, which came from the tribal government using federal funds.

PERRYVILLE GEOGPRAHY

Perryville is located at the south coast of the Alaska Peninsula, some 275 miles southwest of Kodiak and 500 miles southwest of Anchorage, according to the state commerce. The village remains committed to an Alutiiq (Pacific Yupik or Sugpiag) culture and believes in a subsistence lifestyle where commercial fishing provides cash income. The area is only accessible by air and sea. Cargo barges deliver fuel and supplies once a year during the spring. ATVs and skiffs, or small boats, are the core means of local transportation.

A WIND-WIN SITUATION

Everyone benefits when local governments and the community install Skystream wind turbines to help power public buildings and towns. Local schools can take advantage of the turbine’s operation to incorporate into their curriculums. When Skystream turbine blades are spinning, they’re generating energy you don’t have to buy from the electric utility. When you need more energy than your Skystream produces, your electric utility takes over just they way you’re used to—seamlessly and with no loss of power.

Just as important for the future of your town or city, using wind energy helps attract businesses and residents who want to be part of the green community that’s doing its part to move toward energy independence.

See if wind will work for your community.

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