In the news: Small and Large scale wind turbines are making a difference


In the news: Small and Large scale wind turbines are making a difference

Small is Beautiful - the benefits of distributed energy generation
Greenenergynet.com
The Electricity Market Reform White Paper may have grabbed all of the headlines when it was published on 12th July 2011, but another document published by DECC at the same time also made for interesting reading. The Renewable Energy Roadmap sets out how the UK Government, along with the devolved administrations, hopes to achieve an increase of more than four-fold in the consumption of renewable energy by the end of the decade. It looks at the actions to tackle barriers to the wider rollout of renewables and identifies the key technologies - including wind, biomass and heat pumps - which it believes have the greatest potential to help meet targets.

Iowa hits 20 percent wind power
AWEA.org
U.S. wind energy continued to rebound in the second quarter, with 2,151 megawatts (MW) of electrical generating capacity installed in the first half of 2011 versus 1,250 MW during the same time in 2010, up 72 percent. However, analysts at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) cautioned that without stable policy such as an extension of the Production Tax Credit, set to expire in 2012, the industry's recovery will stall.

How Wind Helps Coal Plants
Greentechgrid.com
The sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow, but guess what? Coal plants don't work all the time, either. Advanced grid management practices proved effective in easing power shortages twice this year in Texas with wind energy-generated electricity, according to Michael Goggin, the electric industry analyst for the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA).

Smaller Wind Turbines Growing in Popularity
Uticaod.com
If it’s windy enough at your home or business, you might want to consider installing wind turbines – and they don’t have to be part of a large-scale project that often becomes controversial. Some area residents and businesses are using smaller turbines – some more than 100 feet tall and others only about 6 feet tall – to help with their electricity costs.


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